Mark S. Goodacre
  • Mark S. Goodacre

  • Professor
  • Religious Studies
  • 314 Gray Bldg, Durham, NC 27708
  • Campus Box 90964
  • Phone: (919) 660-3503
  • Office Hours: Wednesdays and Fridays, 11.30--12.30, or by appointment. Email goodacre@duke.edu.
  • Homepage
  • Secondary web page
  • Twitter
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Overview

    Mark Goodacre is a Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Duke University. He specializes in the New Testament and Christian Origins. He earned his MA, M.Phil and DPhil at the University of Oxford and was Senior Lecturer at the University of Birmingham until 2005.

    His research interests include Jesus, the Synoptic Gospels, John's Gospel, the Gospel of Thomas and Jesus in Film. He is the author of four books including The Case Against Q: Studies in Markan Priority and the Synoptic Problem (Harrisburg, PA: Trinity Press International, 2002) and Thomas and the Gospels: The Case for Thomas's Familiarity with the Synoptics (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2012). He is well known for internet sites like The New Testament Gateway and his podcast, the NT Pod. For more details, see Mark Goodacre's homepage.
  • Bio

    Mark Goodacre is Professor in the Department of Religion at Duke; he specializes in New Testament and Christian Origins. He earned his MA, M.Phil and DPhil at the University of Oxford and was Senior Lecturer at the University of Birmingham until 2005. His research interests include the Synoptic Gospels, the Historical Jesus and the Gospel of Thomas. Goodacre is editor of the Library of New Testament Studies book series and the author of four books including The Case Against Q: Studies in Markan Priority and the Synoptic Problem (Harrisburg, PA: Trinity Press International, 2002) and Thomas and the Gospels: The Case for Thomas's Familiarity with the Synoptics (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2012). He is well known for The New Testament Gateway, the web directory of academic New Testament resources, and he has his own regular podcast on the New Testament, the NT Pod. Goodacre has acted as consultant for several TV and radio programs including The Passion (BBC / HBO, 2008), The Bible: A History (Channel 4, 2011) and The Bible (History Channel, 2013). For more details, see Mark Goodacre's homepage.
  • Specialties

    • New Testament
    • Christianity
  • Research Summary

    New Testament, Gospels, Historical Jesus, Paul, Christian Origins, Gospel of Thomas, Jesus in Film, the Internet
  • Research Description

    Mark Goodacre is a Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Duke University. He specializes in the New Testament and Christian Origins. He earned his MA, M.Phil and DPhil at the University of Oxford and was Senior Lecturer at the University of Birmingham until 2005.

    His research interests include Jesus and early Christian Gospels including the Gospel of Thomas, film, Paul and Christology. Goodacre is editor of the Library of New Testament Studies book series and the author of four books including The Case Against Q: Studies in Markan Priority and the Synoptic Problem (Harrisburg, PA: Trinity Press International, 2002) and Thomas and the Gospels: The Case for Thomas's Familiarity with the Synoptics (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2012). He is well known for the award-winning internet site, The New Testament Gateway, the web directory of academic New Testament resources and for his regular podcast, the NT Pod. For more details, see Mark Goodacre's homepage.
  • Current Projects

    Non-canonical Gospels, Gospel of Mary, Passion Narrative, Pauline chronology, Epistle to the Galatians, Bible Films, Christology
  • Areas of Interest

    New Testament
    Gospels
    Historical Jesus
    Early Christian Gospels
    Christology
    Paul
    Gospel of Thomas
    Bible and Film
    Bible and the Internet
  • Education

      • DPhil,
      • Theology,
      • University of Oxford,
      • 1994
      • Ph.D.,
      • University of Oxford (UK),
      • 1994
      • M.Phil.,
      • Theology,
      • University of Oxford (UK),
      • 1990
      • B.A.,
      • Theology,
      • University of Oxford (UK),
      • 1988
  • Selected Publications

      • MS Goodacre.
      • Thomas and the Gospels: The Case for Thomas's Familiarity with the Synoptics.
      • Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing,
      • 2012.
      • [web]
      Publication Description

      The Gospel of Thomas is the noncanonical Gospel par excellence, the "fifth Gospel" that promises scholars new sayings of Jesus and the hope of new insight into Christian origins. But scholars remain divided over whether or not Thomas represents an early, independent witness to the Jesus tradition or whether it is secondary, showing knowledge of the Synoptic Gospels. In Thomas and the Gospels, Mark Goodacre makes a detailed and compelling case that the author of the Gospel of Thomas is familiar with the Synoptic Gospels. He shows that the arguments for independence are inadequate and that the degree of agreement between Thomas and the Synoptics is far too great to be mediated by oral tradition. He points out that Thomas features tell-tale signs of Matthew's and Luke's redaction and that the Gospel should be dated in the early to middle second century, when its author sought to lend an authoritative Synoptic-sounding legitimacy to the voice of his enigmatic Jesus.

      • MS Goodacre.
      • The Case Against Q: Studies in Markan Priority and the Synoptic Problem.
      • Continuum,
      • 2002.
      • [web]
      Publication Description

      For over a century Gospel scholarship has accepted a hypothetical document called Q as one of the major sources of the Synoptic Gospels. In recent times, it has even been transformed from a sayings source to a Gospel in its own right. But, says Mark Goodacre in The Case Against Q, the majority acceptance of Q cannot function as an argument for its existence. From time to time dissenting voices have spoken against such widespread acceptance of Q as a Gospel. Scholars have pointed out, for instance, that Luke's knowledge of Matthew and Mark would enable one to dispense with Q. Yet, such voices often have gone unheeded due to the lack of a clear, balanced, and scholarly treatment of the case against Q. So, in The Case Against Q Goodacre offers a careful and detailed critique of the Q hypothesis, examining the most important arguments of Q's proponents. He then offers new arguments and fresh reflections reaffirming Markan Priority as the key to successful Synoptic scholarship. With this book, Goodacre provides a more plausible picture of Synoptic relationships than has previously been available, as he reconstructs Synoptic interrelationships and Christian origins. Mark Goodacre is Lecturer in New Testament in the Department of Theology at the University of Birmingham (England) and the author of The Synoptic Problem: A Way Through the Maze.

      • Mark Goodacre.
      • The Synoptic Problem: A Way Through the Maze.
      • Understanding the Bible and Its World,
      • London and New York: Continuum,
      • 2001.
      • [web]
      • MS Goodacre.
      • Goulder and the Gospels: An Examination of a New Paradigm.
      • JSNT Sup, 133,
      • Continuum,
      • 1996.
      • [web]
      Publication Description

      Goulder and the Gospels is the first comprehensive response to the radical challenge Michael Goulder has posed for New Testament scholarship. Goulder dispenses with all hypothetical sources-Q, M and L and postulates highly creative evangelists who write in the light of the liturgy. In this penetrating critique, Goodacre provides a critical overview of Goulder's work, focusing on several key areas, the vocabulary of Q, the language of the Minor Agreements, the creativity of Luke and the lectionary theory. He does not simply assess the plausibility of Goulder's ideas but also develops new ways to test them. The theories are sometimes found to be wanting, but at the same time Goulder is reaffirmed as one of the most important and stimulating Biblical scholars of this generation.

      • M Goodacre.
      • "How Reliable is the Story of the Nag Hammadi Discovery?."
      • Journal for the Study of the New Testament
      • 35
      • .4
      • (2013)
      • :
      • 303-322.
      • [web]
      Publication Description

      James Robinson’s narrative of how the Nag Hammadi codices were discovered is popular and compelling, a piece of fine investigative journalism that includes intrigue and blood vengeance. But there are several different, conflicting versions of the story, including two-person (1977), seven-person (1979) and eight-person (1981) versions. Disagreements include the name of the person who first found the jar. Martin Krause and Rodolphe Kasser both questioned these stories in 1984, and their scepticism is corroborated by the Channel 4 (UK) series, The Gnostics (1987), which features Muhammad ‘Ali himself, in his only known appearance in front of camera, offering his account of the discovery. Several major points of divergence from the earlier reports raise questions about the reliability of ‘Ali’s testimony. It may be safest to conclude that the earlier account of the discovery offered by Jean Doresse in 1958 is more reliable than the later, more detailed, more vivid versions that are so frequently retold.

      • M Goodacre.
      • "Does peribolaion mean ‘testicle’ in 1 Corinthians 11.15?."
      • Journal of Biblical Literature
      • 130
      • .2
      • Society of Biblical Literature,
      • (2011)
      • :
      • 391-396.
      • [web]
      • MS Goodacre.
      • "Criticizing the Criterion of Multiple Attestation: The Historical Jesus and the Question of Sources."
      • Jesus, Criteria, and the Demise of Authenticity.
      • Ed. C Keith and AL Donne.
      • London & New York:
      • T & T Clark International,
      • 2012.
      • 152-69.
      • [web]
      • MS Goodacre.
      • "The Talpiyot Tomb and the Bloggers."
      • Archaeology, Bible, Politics and the Media: Proceedings of the Duke University Conference, April 23–24, 2009
      • .
      • Archaeology, Bible, Politics and the Media: Proceedings of the Duke University Conference, April 23–24, 2009.
      • Ed. EM Meyers and C Meyers.
      • Winona Lake:
      • Eisenbrauns,
      • (2013)
      • :
      • 56-68.
      • [web]
      • MS Goodacre.
      • "The Evangelists' Use of the Old Testament and the Synoptic Problem."
      • New Studies in the Synoptic Problem: Oxford Conference, April 2008
      • .
      • New Studies in the Synoptic Problem.
      • Ed. P Foster and A Gregory and JS Kloppenborg and J Verheyden.
      • Leuven:
      • Peeters Publishers,
      • (2011)
      • :
      • 281-298.
      • (281-98)
      • [web]
      • MS Goodacre.
      • "The Rock on Rocky Ground: Matthew, Mark and Peter as Skandalon."
      • What is it that the Scripture Says?: Essays in Biblical Interpretation, Translation, And Reception in Honour of Henry Wansbrough Osb.
      • Ed. P McCosker.
      • Library of New Testament Studies;,
      • Continuum,
      • 2013.
      • 61-73.
      • [web]
      • MS Goodacre.
      • "Scripturalization in Mark’s Crucifixion Narrative."
      • The Trial and Death of Jesus: Essays on the Passion Narrative in Mark.
      • Ed. GV Oyen and T Shepherd.
      • Peeters Publishers,
      • 2013.
      • 33-47.
      • [web]
      • Mark Goodacre.
      • "Mark, Elijah, the Baptist and Matthew: The Success of the First Intertextual Reading of Mark."
      • Biblical Interpretation in Early Christian Gospels, Volume 2: Matthew.
      • Ed. Tom Hatina.
      • Library of New Testament Studies, 310;,
      • London & New York:
      • T & T Clark,
      • 2008.
      • 73-84.
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